All posts by englewoodindependent

WMS PRIDE students for April

First Posted: 4:39 pm - May 21st, 2016

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One student per grade level is recognized each month for displaying behaviors that are aligned with P.R.I.D.E.! Pictured are the Spotlight Students for April at Wheelersburg Middle School (L-R): 4th – C. Conn, 8th – B. Ottney, 7th – E. Boggs, 6th – S. Warnock, 5th – M. Nolan

One student per grade level is recognized each month for displaying behaviors that are aligned with P.R.I.D.E.! Pictured are the Spotlight Students for April at Wheelersburg Middle School (L-R): 4th – C. Conn, 8th – B. Ottney, 7th – E. Boggs, 6th – S. Warnock, 5th – M. Nolan

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Do You Know A Hero?

First Posted: 7:35 pm - May 20th, 2016

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Do you know a hero—someone who has saved a life, made our community a safer place or gone above and beyond to help someone in need? Each year, the Ohio River Valley American Red Cross presents awards to local heroes who saved lives, exemplified the Red Cross mission or made significant, positive differences in our community in the areas of emergency response, disaster preparedness and prevention.

The individuals are recognized at the Red Cross Heroes Breakfast on Thursday, Aug. 18, at the Friend’s Community Center. The breakfast begins at 7:30 a.m. and concludes by 9:15 a.m. so guests may get to work or to other obligations.

“Heroes come in many shapes and sizes, in the past we have honored individuals, groups, adults, children and even pets,” says ORV Red Cross Community Executive Debbie Smith. “We appreciate creative nominations.”

Hero categories include: Blood/Tissue/Organ Hero; CPR/AED/First Aid Hero; Community Hero; Military/Veteran Hero; Fire/Preparedness Hero; Adult Good Samaritan; Workplace Hero; Wellness Hero; Youth Good Samaritan; Volunteer Hero; Volunteer Hero; and the Marcia Sanderlin Hero Award, which is presented to a Red Cross volunteer or supporter who has gone

above and beyond expectations either as a volunteer or financial supporter.

Nominations are due no later than Friday, July 1. When nominating a group, at least one individual from the group must reside in Jackson, Pike, Lawrence, Adams, Brown or Scioto counties. The act of heroism must have occurred after July 1, 2015, or be ongoing. Nomination forms may be picked up at the Red Cross office, 1801 Robinson Ave., or downloaded from the Red Cross ORV Facebook page: www.facebook.com/ORVredcross.

Sponsorships are being solicited as well. Anyone interested in becoming a Hero Sponsor may contact the ORV Red Cross at 740-354-3293. Tickets for the event are $10 per person or $25 for patron seats.

All proceeds help support local disaster prevention, preparation and relief, the lifesaving training of first aid, CPR/AED classes, collection and testing of blood and blood products, support to military members serving around the globe, the transportation program, and international programs provided by the American Red Cross.

Grants available to address mosquitos

First Posted: 3:14 pm - May 20th, 2016

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In March Lawrence Scioto Solid Waste Management District Director Dan Palmer attended a Scrap Tire Management Summit. The summit was organized by the Organization of Solid Waste Districts of Ohio, in partnership with the County Commissioners Association of Ohio and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

One of the over reaching goals of the summit was to bring officials together from throughout the state to talk about scrap times and what can be done to address illegal dumping that’s occurring throughout the state.

Palmer said he came away from the summit with a lot of ideas, to help address the issue of tire dumping in Scioto and Lawrence Counties.

Since late last year the Lawrence Scioto Solid Waste Management District, has been involved in an awareness campaign, aimed at informing the communities about penalties of tire dumping.

As a part of the campaign Palmer visited with law enforcement agencies, scrap yards and many other places passing out posters, addressing the possible penalties that could be imposed if someone is caught dumping tires.

“I have been all over Scioto County hoping to hit everybody (with awareness posters) and the response has been good,” Palmer said. “Everyone from tire distributors, tire dealers, new car dealers to the police. state patrol and sheriff. Everyone has been very receptive.”

Part of the awareness campaign is educating the community on environmental laws, concerning tires.

At the summit Palmer was made aware of a grant being made available to local health departments, through the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to mitigate the potential for an outbreak of mosquito borne viruses such as Zika, West Nile, and La Cross Encephalitis.

Palmer said one of the advantages of the grant, is to partner with solid waste management districts. Palmer said he’s been in conversations with the Portsmouth and Scioto County Health Department about partnering to receive this grant.

EPA grants can be used to address mosquito control measures, with first and second round funding applications due in March.

The Lawrence Scioto Solid Waste Management District can be reached at 740-532-1231.

Wayne Allen can be reached at 740-353-3101 ext. 1933 or @WayneAllenPDT on Twitter

Tax holiday continues

First Posted: 11:40 am - May 20th, 2016

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Joshua Smith taking his daughters, Breanna and Ania Smith, school shopping at Walmart. The girls are preparing to resume school at New Boston on August 24.

Recently the Ohio Legislature passed a measure that called for the sales tax holiday that occurred in 2015 to happen again in 2016. Many legislators and organizations throughout the state are praising the decision.

According to the Ohio Council of Retail Merchants, Governor John Kasich signedSenate Bill 264 last week creating Ohio’s 2016 sales tax holiday this Aug. 5-7. Senate Bill 264 waives state and local sales tax for clothing $75 per item or under and school supplies and instructional materials $20 per item or under.

Jason Kester, executive Director of the Southern Ohio Port Authority said there’s positive and negative aspects of the sales tax holiday.

Kester said some of the positive aspects of the tax holiday include, allowing families to purchase school supplies and related items at a lower cost and it helps parents stretch their school supply budgets further. He said the negative aspect of the tax holiday, would result is less sales tax revenue for the county.

Scioto County received $1.03 million in sales tax for the month of August 2015 and $1.08 million in sales tax for the month of August 2014.

According to a University of Cincinnati Economic Research Center study, Ohio’s August 2015 sales tax holiday boosted Ohio sales tax revenues by $4.7 million while saving Ohio consumers $3.3 million in taxes.

According to the study, “Overall retail sales in Ohio increased 6.48 percent in August 2015. The three day holiday period from August 7-9, 2015 generated a gross increase in sales tax collections of about nine percent. The state of Ohio experienced an increase of about $8 million in sales tax collections while foregoing taxes of $3.3 million on exempted goods during the sales tax holiday. The state is estimated to have collected sales tax of $100 million during this three-day period.

Gordon Gough, President and CEO of the Ohio Council of Retail Merchants praised the passage of Senate Bill 264.

“Last year’s event was a tremendous success. We are confident this year’s event will be just as successful, if not better. We also thank the bill’s lead sponsor State Senator Kevin Bacon and the leaders and entire membership of the Ohio General Assembly for extending this valuable benefit to Ohio’s families, taxpayers and economy,” Gough said.

According to released information from Bacon’s office, Senate Bill 264 was written to extend the sales tax holiday to online retailers. The online retailers will waive the collection of state and local sales taxes on eligible items during the sales tax holiday.

Wayne Allen can be reached at 740-353-3101 ext. 1933 or @Wayneallenpdt on Twitter

ODOT Travel Report

First Posted: 10:47 am - May 20th, 2016

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The following traffic advisory includes road construction and major maintenance projects requiring long-term lane restrictions and/or closures along the state and federal highway system within ODOT District 9. For statewide information regarding road conditions affected by weather, construction, maintenance or accidents, visit ODOT on the web at www.Ohgo.com

DISTRICTWIDE

A districtwide raised pavement marker (RPM) project is under way on various routes throughout the area. Crews will be working from approximately 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily as weather permits to install RPMs, and traffic will be maintained by flaggers and/or arrow boards. The project is anticipated to be completed by early summer. (#16-1011)

A districtwide herbicidal spraying project is scheduled to begin in late April. Crews will be working along various routes throughout the district from approximately 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily, as weather permits, and traffic will be maintained by flaggers and/or arrow boards. The project is anticipated to be completed by early summer. (#16-1016)

A districtwide pavement marking project is under way on various routes throughout the area. Crews will be working during weekday, business hours as weather permits, and traffic will be maintained by flaggers and/or arrow boards. The project is anticipated to be completed by early summer. (#15-1063)

A districtwide mowing project on four-lane and selected two-lane routes in the area is scheduled to begin in early May. Crews will be working from approximately 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily, as weather permits, as work will be conducted off the roadway, there should be little to no impact to traffic; however, motorists are reminded of the need for additional caution in work zones where crews will be moving on and off routes. The project is anticipated to be completed in mid-fall. (#16-1008)

MAY 16: A districtwide guardrail replacement project is scheduled to start the week of May 16, and crews will be replacing guardrail at various locations on routes throughout the area. Crews will be working during weekday, business hours as weather permits, and traffic will be maintained by flaggers, arrow boards and/or temporary signals. The project is anticipated to be completed in early fall. (#16-0180)

ADAMS COUNTY

THURSDAY, MAY 19: S.R. 125 will be closed between the intersections of C.R. 5 (Weaver Road), approximately one mile east of S.R. 348, for a single-day culvert replacement project. The closure will be in effect from approximately 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., or until all work is completed, and while the route is closed, motorists will be detoured via U.S. 52, S.R. 247 and S.R. 41.

S.R. 73 is reduced to one lane between T.R. 196 (Dutch Thomas Road) and T.R. 118 (Seaman Road), approximately 1.5 miles north of S.R. 41 at Peebles, for a bridge replacement project. Throughout construction, traffic will be maintained in one, 10-foot lane with the use of temporary signals. The project is anticipated to be completed in late summer. (#15-0509)

A bridge repair project is under way at two locations on S.R. 32, with the route reduced to one lane in each direction. The first site is located at the Norfolk-Southern Railroad overpass, between T.R. 130 (Mendenhall Road) and T.R. 126 (Plum Run Road), and the second location is between C.R. 198 (Portsmouth Road) and S.R. 73. Throughout construction traffic will be maintained in one, 11-foot lane in each direction. (#15-3001)

Operations are under way on S.R. 41 for a bridge replacement project. The project site is situated between T.R. 91 (Murphin Ridge Road) and C.R. 6 (Fawcett Road), south of S.R. 781. During the initial phase, crews will be clearing the site, and traffic will be maintained by flaggers. Traffic will be maintained in one, 12-foot lane with the use of temporary traffic signals throughout construction, and all work is scheduled to be completed by mid-summer. (#16-0001)

JACKSON COUNTY

Dickason Street in the city of Jackson is closed for a bridge replacement project. The project site is located one block south of Huron Street in the city, and while the route is closed, motorists will be detoured via Burlington Road. The project is anticipated to be completed in early fall. (#15-3048)

Crews will be repairing bridge decks and approach slabs on various bridges in the east and westbound direction on U.S. 35, between Township Road 223 (Caves Road) and the S.R. 32 interchange, as weather permits. Throughout the project, U.S. 35 will be reduced to one lane in either direction at the designated bridges, and all work is scheduled to be completed in early summer. (#16-1027)

LAWRENCE COUNTY

S.R. 243 is reduced to one lane during daytime, working hours for a resurfacing project. The work zone extends from U.S. 52 at Coal Grove to just east of T.R. 117 (Corbin Creek Road). Throughout construction, traffic will be maintained in one lane by flaggers. The project is scheduled to be completed in mid-summer. (#15-0534)

C.R. 13 (Long Creek Road) is closed for a bridge replacement project over Watson Creek. The project site is situated immediately north (west) of the junction with C.R. 37 (Scottown-Lecta Road), and while the route is closed, motorists will be detoured locally and via S.R. 775. This project is part of the Ohio Bridge Partnership Program, and bridge replacements will also take place on C.R. 4 and C.R. 6. The start dates and closures of these structures are yet to be determined. The entire project is scheduled to be completed in late summer. (#15-3032)

Preliminary operations for a bridge repair project on S.R. 7 are under way. The project site is situated between C.R. 15 (Buffalo Creek Road) and the interchange ramp from U.S. 52, and during the initial phase of the project, there should be little to no impact to traffic. Later in the project, traffic will be restricted to one, 12-foot lane in each direction. All work is anticipated to be completed in mid-fall. (#16-0020)

A rockfall remediation project is under way on U.S. 52, between the Ashland, Kentucky twin bridges to just east of C.R. 268 (Crabtree Hollow Road). Throughout construction, westbound U.S. 52 will be reduced to one, 11-foot lane, while eastbound U.S. 52 will remain open to two lanes of traffic. However, all four lanes of the route will be subject to short-term, temporary closure during scaling operations, whereby traffic will be stopped and held for up to 15-minute intervals. The days and times of these intermittent closures have yet to be determined. (#16-7001)

As part of the Ironton-Russell Bridge Replacement project, additional restrictions and traffic pattern changes will go into effect on U.S. 23 in Kentucky, at the junction with Bellefonte Street and the viaduct, adjacent to the approach for the new structure. Southbound U.S. 23 traffic will be reduced to one thru lane, with the passing lane closed to traffic. Northbound U.S. 23 traffic will continue to be maintained in one thru lane and one turn lane for Bellefonte Street; however, traffic patterns will be shifted to the north. The restrictions will be in effect through early August, and motorists are reminded of the need for additional caution in the work zone. (#11-0628) http://www.dot.state.oh.us/districts/D09/Pages/Ironton-Russell-Bridge-Replacement.aspx

PIKE COUNTY

A resurfacing project is under way on S.R. 772 and S.R. 335. Crews will be paving S.R. 772 from S.R. 124 to the Ross County line and S.R. 335, from U.S. 23 to the Waverly corporation limit. Throughout construction, traffic will be maintained in one lane with the use of flaggers, and the project is scheduled to be completed in early summer. (#15-0614)

S.R. 104 is closed between S.R. 552 and T.R. 420 (Boswell Run Road) as part of the Lake White Dam rehabilitation and bridge replacement project. In addition, S.R. 551 is closed between its junction with S.R. 104 and C.R. 93 (Bricker Road), near the park office. Both closures will be in effect through November, and while these routes are closed, through traffic will be detoured by way of U.S. 23 and S.R. 32. Local traffic to the Lake White region will be detoured via S.R. 552 and S.R. 220. Roadway construction is anticipated to be completed in late fall 2016, and the lake is expected to be restored for the fishing and boating season in 2017. (#15-8021)

T.R. 403 (Turkey Run Road) has been closed for a bridge replacement and roadway realignment project, following preliminary work this spring. The project site is located immediately west of the junction with C.R. 32 (Johnson Hill Road), and Turkey Run Road will be subject to a 90-day closure. Traffic will be detoured locally via Johnson Hill, Clines Chapel and Nipgen roads. The entire project is scheduled to be completed in early fall. (#15-0570)

SCIOTO COUNTY

Preliminary operations for a slide repair project are under way on S.R. 772, between the village corporation limit of Rarden and T.R. 77 (Kirker Road), and during the initial phase of the project, there should be little to no impact to traffic. Later in the project, traffic will be maintained in one, 11-foot lane with the use of temporary traffic signals. All work is anticipated to be completed in early fall. (#16-0073)

A resurfacing project is under way on S.R. 348, where crews will be paving the route from its intersection with S.R. 73 to the Adams County line. Throughout construction, traffic will be maintained in one lane with the use of flaggers when crews are at work, and all work is anticipated to be completed in mid-summer. (#15-0502)

Southern Ohio Veterans Memorial Highway

APRIL 25-MAY 21, S.R. 140 will be reduced to one lane between Gallia and Main streets in Sciotodale for culvert installation. Traffic will be maintained by in one, 11-foot lane with temporary signals during this phase of operations.

MAY 9-JUNE 25, S.R. 335 will be reduced to one lane between C.R. 31 (Swauger Valley Road) and C.R. 246 (Stout Hollow Road) for bridge work. Operations will extend from approximately 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily, and traffic will be maintained by flaggers when crews are at work. The route will be open without restrictions during the evening and overnight hours.

APRIL 4-MAY 31, Slocum Avenue will be reduced to one lane between for MSE wall construction at the Slocum Avenue overpass. Crews will be working from approximately 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily, and traffic will be maintained by flaggers. The route will be open without restrictions during the evening and overnight hours.

MARCH 21-MAY 14, C.R. 55 (Fairground Road) will be reduced to one lane between its junction with S.R. 728 and U.S. 23 for MSE wall construction. Crews will be working from approximately 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. each day, and traffic will be maintained by flaggers. The route will be open to two-way traffic without restrictions during the evening and overnight hours.

THRU DECEMBER 2018, C.R. 246 (Stout Hollow Road) is closed at its junction with C.R. 243 (Dutch Ridge Road) for excavation and bridge construction. The closure will be in effect throughout the duration of the project. South Pershing Avenue will be subject to temporary, intermittent restrictions for excavation and paving. Traffic will be maintained by flaggers when crews are at work. North Pershing Avenue in the city of Portsmouth has been closed for reconstruction and relocation. Traffic is being detoured via Marne Avenue. T.R. 237 (Blake Hollow Road) has been closed for clearing, excavation, culvert installation and embankment work. T.R. 234 (Shumway Hollow Road) is closed for relocation and interchange construction. The closure will be in effect throughout the duration of the project. Blasting operations are under way, and although there will be no affect to traffic during operations, residents in the general project area may experience sound or ground vibrations from the blasting, which is expected to occur weekdays during the noon hour and again in late afternoon or early evening. Blasting will continue intermittently throughout the duration of the project.

Additional information regarding the Scioto-823 project is available at www.pgg823.com

The Ohio Department of Transportation maintains the state’s largest man-made asset — the transportation system. ODOT’s mission is to provide the safe and easy movement of people and goods from place to place. As a $2.8 billion per year enterprise, ODOT invests the bulk of its resources in system preservation through maintenance, construction and snow and ice operations.

The environmental review, consultation, and other actions required by applicable Federal environmental laws for these projects are being, or have been, carried out by ODOT pursuant to 23 U.S.C. 327 and a Memorandum of Understanding dated December 11, 2015, and executed by FHWA and ODOT.

Follow ODOT District 9 on Twitter at https://twitter.com/ODOT_SouthOhio and

Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ODOTDistrict9.

Glockner Enterprises Monday Night Elks Golf League

First Posted: 6:57 pm - May 19th, 2016

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Glockner Enterprises Monday Night Elks Golf League

Results from Monday, May 09, 2016

1) Luther Transfer – 110.0

2) Cottle Financial – 103.0

3) Cross Management – 102.0

4) Desco – 101.0

5) Johnson’s Shirt Shop & Trophies Unlimited – 100.5

7) The Mill Tavern – 91.5

8) Glockner Insurance – 89.5

9) Deemer’s Market – 88.5

10) Crystal Klean Car Wash – 79.5

Low Rounds

A Flight) Buck Whitely/Bryan Sturgell (35)

B Flight ) Bob Cross/Tom Pitts/Dave Frantz (41)

C Flight) Jason Burton (43)

D Flight) Joe Krake (44)

E Flight) Randy Allen (44)

Access Scioto County Puts New Vehicle in Service

First Posted: 6:43 pm - May 19th, 2016

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Access Scioto County (ASC) Transit Coordinator Larry Mullins announced this week that ASC’s Wheelersburg Dial-A-Ride has received a new vehicle. The unique looking vehicle is a Mobility Ventures MV-1, which is the first vehicle to be designed from the ground up to be wheelchair accessible, according to Mullins. Mullins added, The MV-1 is built at the AM General assembly plant in Mishawaka, Indiana — the same factory that manufactures Humvees for the military. According to Mullins, the MV-1 is a 2014 model, however it had been used as a demo and had only 13-miles on it when purchased from Shepard Brothers, Inc. of Canadaigua, NY. The original invoice price for the MV-1 was $51,506, however ASC was able to purchase the vehicle for $36,920, according to Mullins. “The funds to purchase the vehicle came from our savings we have realized during the past few years by switching to using propane Autofuel in our main fleet of buses and from Alternative Fuel Tax rebates,” Mullins said. “We feel that the MV-1 is better choice for our Dial-A-Ride service and will help us serve the people of the Wheelersburg area better,” Mullins said. For more information please contact ASC Coordinator Larry Mullins at 740-353-5626, extension 208 Note: The Wheelersburg Dial-A-Ride service operates Monday – Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Access Scioto County (ASC) Transit Coordinator Larry Mullins announced this week that ASC’s Wheelersburg Dial-A-Ride has received a new vehicle. The unique looking vehicle is a Mobility Ventures MV-1, which is the first vehicle to be designed from the ground up to be wheelchair accessible, according to Mullins. Mullins added, The MV-1 is built at the AM General assembly plant in Mishawaka, Indiana — the same factory that manufactures Humvees for the military. According to Mullins, the MV-1 is a 2014 model, however it had been used as a demo and had only 13-miles on it when purchased from Shepard Brothers, Inc. of Canadaigua, NY. The original invoice price for the MV-1 was $51,506, however ASC was able to purchase the vehicle for $36,920, according to Mullins. “The funds to purchase the vehicle came from our savings we have realized during the past few years by switching to using propane Autofuel in our main fleet of buses and from Alternative Fuel Tax rebates,” Mullins said. “We feel that the MV-1 is better choice for our Dial-A-Ride service and will help us serve the people of the Wheelersburg area better,” Mullins said. For more information please contact ASC Coordinator Larry Mullins at 740-353-5626, extension 208 Note: The Wheelersburg Dial-A-Ride service operates Monday – Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Access Scioto County (ASC) Transit Coordinator Larry Mullins announced this week that ASC’s Wheelersburg Dial-A-Ride has received a new vehicle.

The unique looking vehicle is a Mobility Ventures MV-1, which is the first vehicle to be designed from the ground up to be wheelchair accessible, according to Mullins.

Mullins added, The MV-1 is built at the AM General assembly plant in Mishawaka, Indiana — the same factory that manufactures Humvees for the military.

According to Mullins, the MV-1 is a 2014 model, however it had been used as a demo and had only 13-miles on it when purchased from Shepard Brothers, Inc. of Canadaigua, NY.

The original invoice price for the MV-1 was $51,506, however ASC was able to purchase the vehicle for $36,920, according to Mullins.

“The funds to purchase the vehicle came from our savings we have realized during the past few years by switching to using propane Autofuel in our main fleet of buses and from Alternative Fuel Tax rebates,” Mullins said.

“We feel that the MV-1 is better choice for our Dial-A-Ride service and will help us serve the people of the Wheelersburg area better,” Mullins said.

For more information please contact ASC Coordinator Larry Mullins at 740-353-5626, extension 208

Note: The Wheelersburg Dial-A-Ride service operates Monday – Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Access Scioto County (ASC) Transit Coordinator Larry Mullins announced this week that ASC’s Wheelersburg Dial-A-Ride has received a new vehicle.

The unique looking vehicle is a Mobility Ventures MV-1, which is the first vehicle to be designed from the ground up to be wheelchair accessible, according to Mullins.

Mullins added, The MV-1 is built at the AM General assembly plant in Mishawaka, Indiana — the same factory that manufactures Humvees for the military.

According to Mullins, the MV-1 is a 2014 model, however it had been used as a demo and had only 13-miles on it when purchased from Shepard Brothers, Inc. of Canadaigua, NY.

The original invoice price for the MV-1 was $51,506, however ASC was able to purchase the vehicle for $36,920, according to Mullins.

“The funds to purchase the vehicle came from our savings we have realized during the past few years by switching to using propane Autofuel in our main fleet of buses and from Alternative Fuel Tax rebates,” Mullins said.

“We feel that the MV-1 is better choice for our Dial-A-Ride service and will help us serve the people of the Wheelersburg area better,” Mullins said.

For more information please contact ASC Coordinator Larry Mullins at 740-353-5626, extension 208

Note: The Wheelersburg Dial-A-Ride service operates Monday – Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4 p.m.

New Medical Directions

First Posted: 4:32 pm - May 19th, 2016

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Pierron

Hippocrates is known more for the origin of the oath taken by physicians, but he may have had more in common with modern prescribers than one might think. According to Specialty Pharmacy Magazine, Hippocrates documented difficulty with his patients staying compliant with their medication therapy. He was quoted as saying, “keep watch also of the faults of patients which often make them lie about the taking of things prescribed.”

Catching up with the consequences of disease symptoms which affect quality of life and improving outcomes can be difficult, not to mention costly, invasive, and uncomfortable. Many medications, with reliable outcomes have been on the market for decades and are proven to be safe and effective in treating diseases such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, and pre-diabetes. These medications can be pushed to the side when drug manufacturers decide to promote and sell newer medication. The overwhelming amount of marketing materials (which can be written with a biased slant), advertising, and aggressive persuasion can contort treatment lines of therapy and confuse treatment goals.

Try to stick to lifestyle modifications to improve your health, but also be able to recognize when lifestyle modification alone is not going to be enough. When possible, start with simple medications which don’t have addictive qualities. There are many reliable medications that won’t dramatically alter your quality of life or negatively affect your wallet. Ask your prescriber if the medication he or she is considering is available in a generic brand. Keep in mind that most generic medications are now made by the same manufacturers (or their partner companies) which make brand name medications. The ability to get samples from your prescriber can have short term benefits, but it can also lead to trouble regarding future disputes with your insurance company over approvals and coverage of your medications, overall expense, and availability.

Medications can come with side effects not related strictly to symptoms, and if they are troublesome, let your pharmacist or prescriber know. Iron tablets for instance can cause constipation, but usually adding a simple stool softener will help. It is important to stay compliant with the wishes of healthcare providers, because an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Kentucky Tourism Sees Strongest Overall Economic Impact Growth in 10 Years

First Posted: 4:07 pm - May 18th, 2016

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Cabinet of Tourism, Arts and Heritage Sec. Don Parkinson announced today that Kentucky’s tourism industry has experienced the strongest overall economic impact growth rate the state has seen since 2005.

Kentucky’s tourism industry generated $13.7 billion in economic impact during 2015, an increase of five percent over the previous year. The industry supported more than 186,000 jobs, including 6,200 jobs created in 2015.

Kentucky tourism generated more than $1.43 billion in taxes, with $184.9 million going directly to local communities. These are the strongest overall numbers the Commonwealth has seen in the past 10 years.

“There continues to be momentum for tourism throughout Kentucky,” said Sec. Parkinson. “Kentucky is blessed with signature industries such as bourbon and horses. Authentic Kentucky destinations continue to draw people to the Commonwealth.”

“The economic impact numbers for 2015 reinforce the fact that the tourism industry continues to be an economic driver for Kentucky,” said Department of Travel and Tourism Commissioner Kristen Branscum. “Our growth in 2015 is a great indicator of how well we are marketing Kentucky and the encouraging way visitors are responding.”

The Kentucky Department of Travel and Tourism plans to build upon the six pillars of Kentucky Tourism (horses, bourbon, music, arts, outdoors and culinary) over the next year with creative marketing and programming that will reach new audiences and present Kentucky as a top-level destination.

Additionally, the budget approved by Gov. Matt Bevin includes $18 million in additional funding to improve the safety and aesthetics of Kentucky State Parks. These improvements will strengthen Kentucky’s tourism industry.

The report was produced for the Kentucky Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet by Certec Inc., of Versailles. The tourism economic impact study is available at www.kentuckytourism.com/industry.

To learn more about Kentucky tourism, visit www.kentuckytourism.com

Consultants hired to examine airport

First Posted: 1:10 pm - May 18th, 2016

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The Southern Ohio Port Authority (SOPA) Board of Directors recntly heard from consultants hired to examine possible industrial opportunities around the Greater Portsmouth Regional Airport in Minford.

Robert Ingram and Tucson Roberts are the consultants hired to explore possibilities at the airport.

One of the areas Ingram and Roberts work together in is aviation.

“We both have experience in recruiting companies, everybody that makes the planes, that make the parts for them to repair them to the engineering centers we’ve been involved in all of them,” Ingram said.

SOPA Executive Director Jason Kester had looked around Ohio for consultants that would examine the airport and the potential it has to target and recruit aerospace and aerospace related companies.

Ingram said he and Roberts will concentrate on aerospace, but will also be looking for other things based on their 75 years experience.

“Aviation is a very broad sector, it covers military, commercial, maintenance overhaul and repair, its R&D (Research and Development) and it’s space,” Roberts said. “When you talk about aerospace you’re talking about everything that fly’s. When you talk about aviation, you’re talking about everything that fly’s in the atmosphere. We’ll cover both of those topics.”

Roberts said the two will look at the area workforce, existing industries, they are going to look at comparable communities in the United States that Portsmouth could compete with.

“There are certain communities in the United States that have concentrations of aerospace. We’ll set out the advantages you (Scioto County) have over them and that makes it easy recruit. We’ll also identify the industries by name, that you should recruit, we will then put together a marketing plan on just how to do it,” Roberts said.

Roberts said with the completion of the Southern Ohio Veterans Memorial Highway, the Greater Portsmouth Regional Airport will be in a good place for possible development.

Roberts said their work will take roughly two and a half months to complete.

Once their work is complete, Ingram and Roberts will present their findings to SOPA.

The Greater Portsmouth Regional Airport Board and the Scioto County Commissioners are support the work on the study in various ways.

For more information about the programs and activities of SOPA visit, www.sohpa.org.

Wayne Allen can be reached at 740-353-3101 ext. 1933 or @WayneallenPDT on Twitter

Husted Announces Support for Initiative

First Posted: 12:58 pm - May 18th, 2016

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COLUMBUS – Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted today announced his “Safe at Home” initiative has been endorsed by 36 county prosecuting attorneys from across Ohio as well as numerous advocacy groups and non-profit organizations.

The address listed on a voter’s registration is, by statute, a public record and logged within the individual county’s voter rolls and reported to the Secretary of State for inclusion in the Statewide Voter Database. Victims’ advocates report that individuals who have been subject to violent crimes will commonly choose to not register to vote for fear that their attacker may be able to locate and harm them.

“It may not surprise many to know there are those in the world who do not vote out of fear for their personal safety,” Secretary Husted said. “But, it may come as surprise to find out those people are our friends and neighbors right here in Ohio.”

Secretary Husted’s Safe at Home initiative would, if approved by the legislature, allow victims to apply for a confidential address through the Secretary of State’s Office in order to shield their personal information from public view so they can register to vote and cast a ballot without fear that their location may be disclosed to the public. Registrants would work through a victim’s advocate, who can connect them with additional services that ensure their safety and well-being, to enroll in the program.

Currently, 36 different county prosecutors have endorsed the common sense legislation.

The initiative has also been endorsed by 10 mayors and three city police chiefs.

A number of organizations and law enforcement and victim advocacy groups have also backed the measure, including: the Ohio Troopers Association, the Buckeye State Sheriff’s Association, the Fraternal Order of Police, the Ohio Municipal League, the Ohio Domestic Violence Network, the West Side Catholic Center, the Tri-County Help Center, Inc., Shelter from Violence, Inc., the Rape Crisis Domestic Violence Safe Haven, Safe Harbour DV Shelter, Project Woman Springfield & Clark County, the Open Arms Domestic Violence & Rape Crisis Services, My Sister’s Place, My Sister’s House – Domestic Violence Shelter Program, the Jewish Family Service Association of Cleveland, Homesafe, Inc, the Highland County DV Task Force, the Domestic Violence Project, Inc, the Catholic Charities Regional Agency/Christina House, and the Caritas House Domestic Violence Shelter.

Secretary Husted’s Safe at Home initiative has been introduced in both chambers of the General Assembly as House Bill 359, jointly sponsored by Representatives Mike Duffey (R–Worthington) and Anne Gonzalez (R–Westerville), and Senate Bill 222, jointly sponsored by Senators Peggy Lehner (R–Kettering) and Sandra Williams (D–Cleveland). House Bill 359 passed the Ohio House of Representatives unanimously on January 27, 2016 and is awaiting a vote in the Ohio Senate.

Kasich names asim haque as new chair

First Posted: 12:37 pm - May 18th, 2016

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COLUMBUS – Gov. John R. Kasich named Asim Z. Haque, a member of the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) since 2013 and the current vice chair, to serve as chairman of the commission. Haque will succeed Andre Porter, who recently announced his decision to step down as chairman on May 20 to accept a position in the private sector.

“Throughout his three years of service on the PUCO, Commissioner Haque has demonstrated an exceptional command of the issues and challenges facing Ohio’s energy markets. No one is better prepared to apply that level of expertise and independent judgment to the role of chairman,” Gov. Kasich said.

“I am honored by the governor’s confidence in my ability to lead the commission, and I look forward to working with my fellow commissioners and the talented PUCO staff to foster energy policies that further strengthen Ohio’s job growth with affordable, reliable power,” Haque said.

Haque was first appointed to the PUCO by Gov. Kasich in June 2013 to complete three years of an unexpired term and recently reappointed by the governor to a full five-year term. His term will expire in April 2021 and the appointment is subject to the advice and consent of the Ohio Senate.

Haque holds a bachelor of arts degree in chemistry and political science from Case Western Reserve University and a juris doctorate from The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law. He and his family reside in Columbus.

Scioto Foundation Annual Meeting

First Posted: 10:25 am - May 18th, 2016

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Pictured is Matt Martin, Program Director of Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership.

The Scioto Foundation’s Annual Meeting took a new twist this year with the presentations by two speakers who focused on the subject of economic development for Portsmouth and Scioto County.

SF Board of Governors Chairman Josh Howard welcomed a good representation of government, business and community leaders, Scioto Foundation donors and grantees, educators and others before introducing speakers Jason Kester, Southern Ohio Port Authority Director, and special consultant Matt Martin, Program Director of the Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership since 2010.

Kester reported on two grants totaling $17,500 awarded by the Scioto Foundation to SOPA to help fund major economic development projects, $10,000 for an economic development website, and $7,500 to complete matching funds required for Portsmouth to participate in the America’s Best Communities national grant competition.

Kester also updated Scioto Foundation guests about Scioto County’s new land bank project which is in the process of being created with the endorsement of city and county officials. In partnership with SOPA, the Scioto Foundation has awarded a grant of $15,000 to provide funds for a consultant to help with the land bank start-up.

Martin, captured the audience’s rapt attention when he described Warren and Trumbull Counties’ strategies used in implementing community revitalization and land bank projects.

After giving background on his community which has many of the same problems as Portsmouth typical of a shrinking city, Martin stressed the importance of community outreach in developing a revitalization plan. Engaging residents and sharing data with them, TNP developed neighborhood plans for each part of Warren and prioritized properties for demolition or renovation in the southwestern part of town. A majority of the projects were on land bank properties, he said.

Martin described several areas targeted for reclaiming vacant spaces through demolition and land use with the help of a $5.2 million dollar federal grant to launch the Trumbull Neighborhood Program goals. His Power Point presentation illustrated a variety of development endeavors such as a garden district, a children’s garden, public art projects, park improvements and farmers’ markets, in addition to the renovation and demolition of buildings and houses. He cited partnerships with churches, youth groups, university urban design students, corporations, and a “Lots to Love” program which came together to accomplish new land uses. Huntington Bank has been a key partner in community development achievements.

Martin also offered details about funding achieved and processes utilized by the Trumbull Neighborhood Partnerships including a real estate developers’ program, in-house renovations by TNP itself, and an “Adopt a Home” project in which private investors donated $25,000 to renovate a house in one Warren neighborhood. Asked in a follow-up question and answer session about the most important things TNP learned in their community economic development, Martin emphasized reaching out to the community and making sure neighborhoods are involved, and obtaining the data first to support desired results.

SSU Masters of Occupational Therapy program hosted the Spring CarFit event

First Posted: 4:21 pm - May 17th, 2016

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PORTSMOUTH, Ohio – Shawnee State University’s Masters of Occupational Therapy program partnered up with Hill View Life Plan Community to host the spring CarFit event in April.

By teaming up with Hill View, it allowed more local seniors to have the opportunity to attend the event and discover their perfect “fit” for their vehicle.

CarFit is a national program developed by AAA, AARP and the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) partnership to help older drivers through a 12-point checklist with their vehicle that will help make their car “fit” better to their comfort and safety. By 2030, there will an expected one in four drivers to be a senior the age of 65 or older, and ill-fitting vehicles can make it uncomfortable and unsafe for older drivers. CarFit is a tool that can work to help keep seniors safer behind the wheel.

Trained professionals from CarFit and occupational therapists will be at the event to provide information to seniors on how to maintain and strengthen their driving health.

At the CarFit event, trained volunteers will check items such as the correct position of the driver’s seat, the driver’s ability to easily reach pedals and the proper adjustments of the mirrors.

For more information about CarFit events, please contact Dr. Christine Raber, MOT Professor at SSU, at craber@shawnee.edu or at 740.351.3530.

Local author releases, ‘She’s Mine’

First Posted: 2:53 pm - May 17th, 2016

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Frank Lewis | Daily Times Juanita Robinson of Portsmouth, displays her first published book entitled, ‘She’s Mine.’

PORTSMOUTH — Juanita Robinson of Portsmouth has added a new dimension to her life. Robinson is now a self-published author of her new book entitled, ‘She’s Mine.”

Robinson said she has had a desire to write for many years, but after going into retirement, she decided to act upon the desire.

“The title is, ‘She’s Mine.’ I retired three years ago, and started doing a lot of reading. I’ve always had a desire to write, but I never did anything about it. So, after I read approximately 250 books I just got up one morning and told my husband, ‘I think I am going to try to write a book today,” Robinson said.

She said her husband Danny Robinson, responded in laughter, thinking that she could not accomplish the task.

“He just said, “You just go right on ahead,” and a few months later I had one written,” she said. “This is just all very new to me. I had the desire to write when I was in high school, but I never did it, then later on got married, had children and raised a family. So this is a new, exciting journey for me.”

Robinson’s actual book-writing journey began March of 2015.

“Last March of 2015 I had an idea, just a little idea and I sat down on March 25th and began typing and by September 5th I had it pretty much completed, but I let it sit for a couple of months and then I added two more chapters.”

After seeking out the necessary components for publishing a book, ‘She’s Mine’ was published January, 28, 2016.

“Afterwards, I got it edited and then I spoke with a person who would format the book and help me get the book published. By January 28th of 2016 it was listed on Kindle,” she said. “I decided to go with the self-publishing method.

In addition to Amazon.com, social media is another method of sharing her new book.

“I have exposed my book on Facebook and I got a lot of people here locally to go ahead and purchase the book. I do have 18 five-star ratings probably from the people here locally who read it and like the book. I did notice that I do have a person from the United Kingdom that purchased it, because Amazon is worldwide.”

Robinson’s fictitious book deals with a young woman in college in Columbus, Ohio.

“The book is about a woman named Annie, who earned a scholarship to a school of her choice and it was basically music that she wanted to go into,” she said. “I did make up a school, and it takes place in Columbus, Ohio. The woman in the story is supposed to be from the Portsmouth area, but I really don’t get into that aspect of it too much.”

The character Annie meest a man who attempts to rape her.

“She goes to school and meets a guy, a fellow classmate who is seven years older than her. He wants to go with her, she does. The first date is good, the second date is not so good and he tries to rape her, but he is not successful. In the meantime, while she is in school someone is stalking her, and she doesn’t know who it is. Then Columbus has a serial rapists on their hands.”

Robinson said she purposefully does not go into in depth discussion about rape, but does discuss some of the after affects of the heinous crime.

“Seven women are raped, and one of them is murdered, and they all look like my main character Annie,” she said. “So she meets a guy and falls in love with him. He is more or less trying to protect her.”

Robinson said book signings for ‘She’s Mine’ are in the works, and will soon be announced.

The newly published author is already working on a sequel to ‘She’s Mine.’

“I did it basically to see if I could do it,” she said. “And now that I have done it, I really enjoyed it and I am currently writing a sequel to the book, and I am going to go ahead and do the self-publishing on the sequel as well.”

For more information visit the She’s Mine Facebook page, or the Juanita Robinson Facebook page.

Reach Portia Williams at 740-353-3101, ext. 1929, or on Twitter @PortiaWillPDT.

S.R. 335 Daytime Restrictions Remain In Effect

First Posted: 10:44 am - May 17th, 2016

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Intermittent lane restrictions on state Route 335 in Scioto County will resume next week as part of the Southern Ohio Veterans Memorial Highway construction project.

Since mid-April, restrictions on S.R. 335 have been in place between C.R. 31 (Swauger Valley Road) and C.R. 246 (Stout Hollow Road), where crews for the Portsmouth Joint Venture (PJV) have been clearing and excavating in preparation for bridge construction over the Little Scioto River.

Moving forward, crews will be working on pier construction for the bridge over S.R. 335 and the Little Scioto, and operations will be in effect from approximately 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Traffic will be maintained by flaggers when crews are at work, and the route will be open to two-way traffic without restrictions during the evening and overnight hours.

Motorists are reminded of the need for additional caution through the entire corridor, where crews and heavy equipment are moving in and out of the various work zones. For more information regarding the Scioto-823 project, visit the Portsmouth Gateway Group’s web site at www.pgg823.com, and follow the project on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Southern-Ohio-Veterans-Memorial-Highway

10th Annual Scioto Brush Creek Sweep

First Posted: 10:33 am - May 17th, 2016

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Shannon and Bill at 2015 SBC Sweep

Otway, OH—Saturday, May 21, 2016 marks the 10th anniversary of the Scioto Brush Creek Sweep. We have come a long way and still have a long way to go. This is a great time to reflect on how this event came to be as well as the impact this event has had on the watershed.

The Scioto Brush Creek Sweep actually began as a replica of the Ohio Brush Creek Sweep. Interestingly enough this is the 25th anniversary of the Ohio Brush Creek Sweep. Many locals refer to either of these creeks as simply “Brush Creek” and some don’t realize they are two totally different streams. Ohio Brush Creek empties into the Ohio River, whereas Scioto Brush Creek empties into the Scioto River. Depending on where you are from determines which “Brush Creek” you might be referring to. Ohio Brush Creek runs South through the center of Adams County while Scioto Brush Creek originates in the Peebles area. It flows to the East where it is joined in Otway by the South Fork of Scioto Brush, which starts in the Blue Creek area.

Since beginning the Scioto Brush Creek Sweep in 2007 we estimate that more than 120 volunteers have removed in excess of 10 tons of garbage and debris from this stream. When we think of the Sweep we generally limit the benefits to only removing the garbage. I feel that it is much more than that. The mission of the Friends of Scioto Brush Creek is “maintaining or improving the water quality of Scioto Brush Creek through awareness, education and involvement of the local residents”. The Sweep covers all three points.

Awareness. The Sweep is what I refer to as a “hands-on, feet-wet” activity. I have discovered that the only way to get anyone to fully appreciate this precious natural resource is to get their feet wet. For those that have ever participated in a Sweep you know that you will end up wet very quickly. I feel confident all participants are much more “aware” after completing a Sweep.

Education. One component of the Sweep is to incorporate an educational component into it. This is usually in the form of having a guest speaker at the conclusion of our shore lunch. In addition we have several participants each year that are naturalists. Who doesn’t want to float one of the cleanest most diverse streams in the state with a naturalist? Each year we all learn from each other and from our guest speaker.

Involvement. This is where the “rubber meets the road”. Many of our participants are local residents that are truly concerned with keeping their watershed clean. Keep in mind we have no geographic limits for membership. I myself do not live in that watershed. We welcome all.

I often talk to school kids about the impacts to our streams. When I talk about the garbage, I try to stress that going to the creek is by far the hardest most inefficient means of trash removal. But once it is there, that is the only way to get it out. It is much easier to pick it up along the road before it can ever make it to a stream. And even better than that is to prevent it from being discarded in the first place. The only way we can change that is by changing our behavior. I feel that the efforts of the Friends of Scioto Brush Creek and all the events that they do, including the Adopt-A-Highway and the Sweep, go a long way in changing people’s behavior. I look back over the last 25 years of conducting sweeps and I have seen a change in behavior. I feel that littering is becoming less socially acceptable like it once was. People are becoming more and more aware of the impacts to our water.

As proof of our success here is a photo of myself with Shannon Browning during last year’s Sweep. She was recently unanimously awarded the “Best Friend of Scioto Brush Creek” for 2015. This is very well deserved. Here is a person that is a product of our Scioto Brush Creek Day. She took an interest in making a difference. She has made a difference. You can too! It reminds me of a famous quote from Dr. Seuss in the Lorax: “Unless someone cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.”

If you are interested in being part of the solution I would encourage you to join the Friends if you are not already a member. Whether a member or not, for those that are up for a challenge, we would love to have you join us during the Sweep or the Adopt-A-Highway cleanups. To sign up for the Sweep please contact Adams Soil and Water Conservation District. You may call 937-544-1010 or email Anita Conaway at: conaway.adams.swcd@live.com.

ABOUT

Founded in 1997 the Friends of Scioto Brush Creek, Inc. is a 501(c)3 non-profit watershed organization whose mission is to protect and maintain Scioto Brush Creek through education, awareness and involvement of local residence. For more information, to become a member or volunteer, contact us at fosbc@scpwildblue.com or visit https://www.facebook.com/friendsofsciotobrushcreek.

State Representative Terry Johnson Named Distinguished Legislator by Food Allergy Research and Education

First Posted: 10:29 am - May 17th, 2016

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Johnson

State Representative Terry Johnson received the Distinguished Legislator award from Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) for his work on House Bill 296 from the 130th General Assembly. House Bill 296 permissively allows a school or school district to stock non-patient specific (available to anyone experiencing a severe allergic reaction) doses of epinephrine on the school grounds. The legislation allows, but does not require, a school district to adopt a protocol to maintain a stock of epinephrine and allow properly trained personnel to administer the emergency epinephrine to a student, staff member or visitors.

This law has already proven its worth. Two children in the Akron area suffered from life-threating allergic reactions this past school year. Both of the children were saved by a staff member who had medical training and was able to use the in stock epinephrine at the school.

“This award comes as a complete surprise, and I appreciate this recognition, but knowing that something I worked on has already saved a youngster’s life—well, that’s really what counts.”

Births at SOMC

First Posted: 7:03 pm - May 16th, 2016

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May 3

Amanda Kitts and Josh Clifford of Portsmouth, daughter

Nathan Howard and Stephanie Smith of Waverly, daughter

May 4

Rena Scott and Adam McKenzie of Portsmouth, son

Sheena and Brian Bonner of Tollesboro (Ky.), daughter

May 6

Amy Kellemeyer and Michael L. Blanton of McDermott, daughter

Crystal Wells and Garrett Wells of Greenup (Ky.), son

May 8

Tananeka Spurlock and Zachary Bentley of Franklin Furnace, daughter

Christopher and Cassandra Bihl of Portsmouth, daughter

Life Jackets are Essential Safety Gear for Every Boater

First Posted: 5:52 pm - May 16th, 2016

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COLUMBUS, OH – It’s a message that can’t be shared enough—wearing a life jacket is critical to keep Ohioans safe while boating. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) will kick off National Safe Boating Week, May 21-27, by holding five “Ready, Set, Wear It!” life jacket safety awareness events. The events are scheduled to take place at The Marina at Caesar Creek State Park, the North Royalton Fire Department, the West Marine Port Clinton store, Toledo’s Side Cut Metropark and the Field & Stream Polaris store in Columbus.

“For a life jacket to save a life, a person has to be wearing it, plain and simple. Wearing a life jacket is the easiest way to stay alive when things go wrong on the water,” said Mike Miller, chief of the ODNR Division of Watercraft. “If an accident occurs and people suddenly end up overboard, a life jacket will keep their heads above water and could save a life. Don’t just have your life jacket close by, wear it!”

The seventh annual “Ready, Set, Wear It!” Life Jacket World Record Day will be held on Saturday, May 21. The goal is to educate the public about the importance of wearing life jackets and safe boating for all ages. Each event will also showcase the comfortable and versatile options available in today’s modern life jackets.

The National Safe Boating Council, in partnership with the Canadian Safe Boating Council, invites the boating community, the general public and the media to participate in “Ready, Set, Wear It!” on May 21. Participating cities throughout Ohio and around the globe will gather to attempt to set a world record for the most life jackets worn and inflatable life jackets inflated.

Headlining the series is the “Ready, Set, Wear It!” event hosted by Field & Stream in partnership with the ODNR Division of Watercraft on Saturday, May 21, from 12–4 p.m., which will include various boating-related activities at the Field & Stream Polaris store. This free family event is open to the public. Participants will have the opportunity to ride a personal watercraft simulator, try on the latest styles of life jackets and enter to win a Field & Stream gift card.

Last year, 10,917 people gathered at over 250 events held around the world, including Ohio, to set a new record for the number of participants who inflated their inflatable life jacket or wore an inherently buoyant life jacket. According to the National Safe Boating Council, Ohio had the second highest participation rate in the nation, with 518 total participants attending one of 14 events around the state.

Ohio boating groups will host events at various venues around the state where boating safety experts will register participants, conduct life jacket safety talks, fit participants for life jackets, stage a countdown and coordinate a group photo.

More Ohio events can be found at http://www.readysetwearit.com/join-event/usa-events/. If people would like to host their own “Ready, Set, Wear It!” event, there is still time to register at ReadySetWearIt.com.

Additional information on life jacket safety is available from the ODNR Division of Watercraft at watercraft.ohiodnr.gov. For more information about the National Safe Boating Council, visit safeboatingcouncil.org.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at ohiodnr.gov.

Controlling College Costs

First Posted: 5:37 pm - May 16th, 2016

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Brown

Holding roundtables across our state is one of the most important things I do in the Senate – it gives me a chance meet with and hear the stories of Ohioans of all backgrounds, and to gather new ideas. One of the early ideas that came out of these roundtables was the Ohio College Presidents Conference – an annual summit to bring together the leaders of Ohio’s great institutions of higher learning.

We have such diversity in higher education in Ohio – we have public and private schools, colleges with a few hundred students and universities with tens of thousands, four-year institutions and community colleges. And at the end of April, leaders from these schools came together at my office in the Senate to discuss the future of higher education in Ohio.

We heard from experts from think tanks and government agencies, journalists, professors, and other senators. But the purpose of the conference isn’t only for the presidents to hear from experts—it’s for the experts, and for me and my staff, to hear from our Ohio leaders in higher education.

They’re the ones creating opportunity for students to be the first in their family to go to college. They’re the ones preparing those students for the jobs of tomorrow. And they are the ones doing the research and partnering with the private sector to create those jobs.

One of the biggest challenges we face in higher education today is ensuring that all Ohioans – no matter what their background is – can afford to take advantage of the great higher-ed options we have in our state.

More than two-thirds of 2014 graduates in Ohio left school with student loan debt, which averaged more than $29,000 for every student.

The total amount of student debt in the United States has more than tripled in the past 10 years, from $363 billion in 2005 to more than $1.32 trillion today– a number that exceeds both credit card and auto loan debt. Across the country, young workers have been forced to postpone important life decisions like getting married, buying a home, or starting a family. Graduates today have less disposable income, lower credit scores, and can struggle to become financially secure adults.

We have to do better.

That’s why this year I joined my colleague Senator Tammy Baldwin to introduce the In the Red Act of 2016, to provide relief for students struggling under mountains of debt, and to make new investments in college affordability.

It would allow students to refinance their outstanding debt at lower rates, increase Pell Grants to keep pace with rising costs, and make new investments in community colleges.

This is just one step we can and should take to create more opportunity for all Ohioans to get a first-class education. It’s also just one of many issues we addressed at the conference – we discussed accreditation, student activism, increasing access to STEM fields, and so much more.

The future of higher education in Ohio is bright – and will be all the brighter when we expand opportunities for all students to graduate without crippling debt and pursue their dreams.

Support youth and agricultural education at statewide community fundraiser

First Posted: 4:42 pm - May 16th, 2016

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COLUMBUS, Ohio (OFBF) – Ohio youth and agricultural education will be the beneficiaries of Ohio Farm Bureau and Friends Days at Bob Evans Restaurants, May 16 and May 17. Fifteen percent of sales from any of Bob Evans’ Ohio restaurants will be donated to the Ohio FFA Foundation, Ohio 4-H Foundation and Ohio Farm Bureau Foundation. It is expected to be the largest community fundraiser in the history of Bob Evans Restaurants.

Patrons must present a printed community fundraiser flyer upon checkout. The flyer is available from local 4-H, FFA and county Farm Bureaus, can be downloaded and printed from ofbf.org or can be found in recent issues of Farm Bureau’s publications Our Ohio magazine and Buckeye Farm News. The fundraising opportunity applies to dine in and carryout meals, gift cards and other merchandise. Bob Evans has 194 Ohio restaurants in 69 counties.

“As longtime supporters of both agriculture and education, Bob Evans is proud to partner with the Ohio Farm Bureau in its initiatives to develop the next generation of farmers and promote the important work of Ohio’s farm community,” said Saed Mohseni, president and CEO of Bob Evans. “Agriculture is part of our past and present – from our rich history shaped on our Homestead Farm in Rio Grande to our relationships today with the farmers who produce the great foods we serve in our restaurants – and we look forward to a successful fundraiser for Ag Days.”

“This will be a tremendous boost for Ohio’s agricultural education programs and the young people they support,” said Jack Fisher, executive vice president of Ohio Farm Bureau. “Bob Evans is making a very generous investment in our communities, so I encourage everyone to get a flyer, visit their local restaurant, have a great meal and help Ohio’s youth.”

Ohio 4-H is the youth development program of OSU Extension that gives children and teens the opportunities to learn and practice life skills through involvement in activities focused on citizenship, healthy living and science.

The Ohio FFA promotes premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. In Ohio, there are more than 25,000 middle and high school students participating in agricultural education programs encompassing all aspects of the science and production of agriculture.

Ohio Farm Bureau’s mission is to forge a partnership between farmers and consumers. The Ohio Farm Bureau Foundation strives to support the next generation of agricultural producers, scientists, business and community leaders.

Bob Evans owns and operates family restaurants in 19 states and is a leading producer of refrigerated side dishes, pork sausage and other food items.

For more information or to print a flyer visit ofbf.org.