Engineer launches website, wins award, starts construction season


Scioto County Engineer Craig Opperman has been busy, recently his office has launched an enhanced website, won an award for work on the Otway Covered Bridge, has started the annual construction and paving season.

Opperman launched an enhanced website, with features aimed at better serving the citizens of Scioto County.

According to released information about the website, “SciotoCountyEngineer.org is the new web address for information related to the Scioto County Engineer’s Office operations. The County Engineer website includes information about which office to contact if you have a question, for example when a new address needs assigned.”

.Other features of the website include current and upcoming projects, services, contacts, and general information about the office. In addition, frequently asked questions are presented to provide insight to some of the more popular questions to the office.

It was announced earlier this month a new Geographic Information System (GIS) was complete. Opperman said the new was launched in anticipation of the GIS system going online.

Through the public can view the tax appraised area of the selected parcel. The system is anticipated to be continually expanded to include additional public information.

Other features of the website include, information relating to the services which are performed by the Scioto County Engineer.

Opperman and his staff also recently started a 2016 in house construction program. The origins of the program started in 2009.

The program started with the installation of a three-sided box bridge on Gephart Road in Bloom Township. This structure will be the 61st bridge under this program. .

The three-sided bridges are fabricated in openings of 10 to 20 feet wide spans to fit the channel with. County Engineer employees fabricate the structures during the winter inside the garage facility. The county maintains 499 bridges of which 12 percent have been constructed through this program since 2009.

“This culvert program has provided several benefits for Scioto County such as quickness of installation allowing for shorter road closures compared to a traditional bridge installation, reduction in cost for structure replacements, and permits significant increases in infrastructure improvement using our existing personnel, resources and funding” Opperman said.

In 2015 Opperman’s staff installed 367 culverts on 43 roads. These culverts installed by county crews would extend 2.83 miles if placed end to end.

Opperman recently announced his office has received a $704,303 grant through the Ohio Public Works Commission, for the 2016 highway improvement program.

Scioto County Engineer employees have been preparing various roads throughout the county since last year in preparation of this year’s resurfacing programs. Over 150 pipes have been replaced already and more scheduled to stay ahead of resurfacing programs.

“A tremendous amount of effort has been expended by the entire staff in order to prepare the roads for resurfacing with the vision and understanding that proper preparation of roads will lead to longer pavement life and lower long term maintenance costs for everyone,” Opperman said in a released statement.

Opperman said several townships have expressed interest in being a part of the highway improvement program, to save on costs.

It’s estimated that road paving as a part of this program will begin in July.

Opperman along with Jones-Stuckey Engineering were recently award for their work on the restoration of the Otway Covered Bridge. Work on the bridge started in 2012.

Opperman and Jones-Stuckey were given the Engineering Excellence Award from the American Council of Engineering Companies of Ohio.

According to released information, these awards are given to recognize the efforts preformed in developing projects “that demonstrate a high degree of achievement, value and integrity. The projects are judged according to four criteria: 1) Original or innovative application of new or existing techniques, 2) Perception by the public, 3) Social, economic, and sustainable design considerations, and 4) Complexity.

“This award honors the commitment to quality that was provided by my staff, the consultants, the contractor and the historical society to reconstruct this structure with reutilization of the vast majority of the historic bridge components,” Opperman said.

This marks the third award received for the project. The County Engineer has received the Historic Bridge Award from the Federal Highway and Ohio Department of Transportation, an Award of Merit from the Ohio History Connection, and the Outstanding Small Project Award from the American Council of Engineering Companies of Ohio.

The Scioto County Engineer maintains the 3rd most bridges for counties in the state of Ohio and the 12th most road miles at 415.

Visit the new SciotoCountyEngineer.org website and contact (740) 355-8265 with any questions or comments.

Wayne Allen can be reached at 740-353-3101 ext. 1933 or @WayneallenPDT on Twitter

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